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US Immigration Law Archives

A bureaucratic 'wall' delays immigrant citizenship

Making the adjustment to the American way of life can be difficult for some lawful permanent resident immigrants as they take the necessary steps to become U.S. citizens. One aspect of which many immigrants are experiencing first-hand is the often cumbersome American bureaucracy. Although there has a backlog for years, since the Trump administration has assumed the reins of power, the time required to become a citizen has doubled or tripled in Arizona and most areas of the country. In sections where there are large immigrant communities, the wait could be four to six times as long.

H-4 visa rule faces final clearance review

The debate over immigration has been contentious in Arizona and around the country since Donald Trump announced that he would be running for president in 2015, and the row over H1-B visas has been particularly fierce. These are the employment-based visas that allow companies to attract job candidates from overseas when workers with the necessary skills cannot be found locally, but critics of the program say that technology firms in particular take advantage of H1-B visas and use them to bring in cheap foreign labor instead of paying fair market rates to Americans.

ICE reportedly targeting married undocumented immigrants

The Trump administration's hardline immigration stance has resulted in many deportations from Arizona and the rest of the nation. While the government may try to claim that the immigration policies are focused on law and order, that claim is belied by the recent focus on deporting undocumented immigrants who are married to U.S. citizens.

Fewer immigrants passing credible fear interviews

Those who enter the United States in Arizona or other recognized locations may request asylum upon arrival. The first step in obtaining asylum is the credible fear interview. This is when an individual shows evidence such as physical wounds to a government agent. However, there is no guarantee that a person will be found credible. One woman was denied despite showing scars and a hand with missing fingers after an attack in Honduras.

Judge orders a halt to reunited immigrant family deportations

Many Arizona residents were shocked to learn that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents were separating the children of undocumented immigrants from their parents at the Mexican border, and they may have been relieved when a national backlash prompted the Trump administration to abandon the controversial policy. However, a new outcry ensued when it emerged that reunited immigrant families were being deported without delay.

Visa overstays

Non-citizens who visit or work in Arizona sometimes have concerns about overstaying their visas. In general, there can be severe legal consequences for not departing the United States before the visa has expired. There are some circumstances under which overstaying a visa may incur minor penalties.

Avoiding problems in keeping permanent resident status

People in Arizona who are not U.S. citizens but have secured permanent resident status should keep their green cards in good standing. The two main ways that green card holders can jeopardize their permanent residencies are by violating the law or spending extended periods of time outside of the United States.

Trump administration to fingerprint immigrant child sponsors

On May 29, the Trump administration announced that it would soon start fingerprinting parents who attempt to claim custody of unaccompanied children detained for entering the U.S. illegally. However, immigrant advocates claim the move may cause undocumented adults in Arizona and elsewhere to abandon their children for fear of being deported.

Temporary Protected Status ending for many immigrants

Some Arizona residents who came to the United States under the Temporary Protected Status program may be sent back to their home countries even if they have been living in the country for decades and have children who are citizens. The Trump administration is phasing out these programs, and now, Hondurans who are in the United States with TPS status must either return home within the next 18 months or remain in the country as an undocumented immigrant.

Cultural confusion can be a detriment to immigrants

Immigrants in Arizona and other states who can't afford an attorney could be tempted to work with "notarios publico," which translates to "public notaries." These notarios tell individuals who are living in the country illegally that they can help them secure work permits and otherwise aid them with the immigration process. However, these notaries could actually put a person's ability to stay in the country in jeopardy.

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