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Posts tagged "US Immigration Law"

Temporary Protected Status ending for many immigrants

Some Arizona residents who came to the United States under the Temporary Protected Status program may be sent back to their home countries even if they have been living in the country for decades and have children who are citizens. The Trump administration is phasing out these programs, and now, Hondurans who are in the United States with TPS status must either return home within the next 18 months or remain in the country as an undocumented immigrant.

Cultural confusion can be a detriment to immigrants

Immigrants in Arizona and other states who can't afford an attorney could be tempted to work with "notarios publico," which translates to "public notaries." These notarios tell individuals who are living in the country illegally that they can help them secure work permits and otherwise aid them with the immigration process. However, these notaries could actually put a person's ability to stay in the country in jeopardy.

Supreme Court rules in DACA case

Immigrants in Arizona and around the country who have sought protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program will continue to be protected for now. On Feb. 26, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal by the Trump administration to a Jan. 9 injunction from a California federal district court judge that put a stop to the administration's efforts to end the DACA program. Around 700,000 people are protected by this program that provides them with work permits for two years and then requires them to reapply.

Trump administration mulling welfare checks for immigrants

Immigrants in Arizona and around the country who receive SNAP benefits or other forms of financial assistance would find obtaining permanent residence more difficult under a policy being considered by President Trump. Immigration officers could check whether or not green card applicants have received or sought to receive public benefits for either themselves or their dependents under a draft policy from the Department of Homeland Security. The agency says that the rule change is needed to prevent immigrants from becoming burdens on society.

The rate of naturalization rises from 2005 to 2015

Arizonans may be interested to learn that most of the largest immigrant groups in the United States had increased rates of naturalization from 2005 to 2015, according to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center. The largest increase was among immigrants from Ecuador and India. The nations that either showed a decline or no change were Honduras, Cuba and China.

New rules may alter who can work in the United States

Since 2015, those who are the spouses of H-1B visa holders have been allowed to work in Arizona and throughout the United States by holding a H-4 visa. However, this rule may be revoked as per an executive order issued by President Trump in April 2017. It is thought that revoking the rule implemented by President Obama could make it harder to convince H-1B visa holders to remain in the country.

How an undocumented person could obtain legal status

Located near the border to Mexico, Arizona is one of several states where undocumented immigrants may choose to live. Although an undocumented person residing anywhere in the United States may face deportation, there is also a chance that they could get permanent resident status. Anyone who has been in the country for 10 consecutive years or longer may qualify for Cancellation of Removal if certain requirements are met.

A second chance for late DACA applications

In what is likely to be heralded as good news in many sectors of Arizona, hundreds of DACA renewal applicants that were said to have missed the October 5th deadline will have the chance to reapply. It came to light that many did, in fact, submit their applications on time, but unexplained Postal Service slowdowns caused their applications to arrive after the deadline.

Central American immigrants may be forced to leave US

Arizona residents may have heard that the United States is ending the special status currently given to 5,300 people of Nicaraguan origin. This protection is set to end in January 2019 according to the Trump administration. Another 86,000 Honduran residents who receive protection under the Temporary Protected Status will continue under that program until July 2018. However, there is no guarantee that the program will be extended after that.

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